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Posts Tagged ‘humor’

A Laugh a Minute

Fool by Christopher Moore; page count 352

Fool by Christopher MooreIf you’re ever in the mood to read something hilarious, pick up any book by Christopher Moore. They’re great. There’s only been one by him I thought was so-so, You Suck, and even that was better than nearly every other vampire novel out and about in the world. (Also ahead of the paranormal curve as it was published in 1995.) Otherwise, his books are a guaranteed* good time.

This Moore title is based on the Bard’s own King Lear. Why Moore decided to take on Shakespeare’s circuitous tale is quite beyond me, but he does it with all the style and heinous fuckery most foul one would expect from Moore. (Note: if you are uncomfortable with the phrase “heinous fuckery most foul” you will not like this book. In fact, you probably won’t like any book penned by Christopher Moore, so ignore this post.) Moore’s version of events focuses in on Lear’s fool. A sideline character in the play, Pocket the Black Fool, is a major catalyst according to Moore.

I actually listened to the audio version of this book. I’m sure I looked like a raving lunatic because I listened while I walked my dog and ended up laughing most of the time. While I mention the audiobook, Euan Morton, the narrator did a fantastic job! All of his characters were unique and even his female characters sounded convincing (something I usually find lacking in male narrators.)

I recommend this to anyone who wants a lighter take on Shakespeare and is not easily offended. It was a great, fun read. If you don’t mind looking barking mad, get the audio version. Morton was fantastic, too.


*Alright, there’s no actual guarantee. However, if you don’t laugh along with his books, there is something seriously wrong with your funny bone.

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The newest Moore title*

Sacre Bleu! by Christopher Moore; page count 416

Sacre BleuChristopher Moore has done it again. Once again, I found myself laughing out loud at his hilarious take on art and Paris in the 1890s. The novel opens with the death of Vincent van Gogh. His two painter friends, Lucien Lessard and Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, happen upon suspicious circumstances within the Parisian art world and decide to investigate. The book is a little history, a little color theory, a little paranormal fantasy, and a whole lot of funny.

I was surprised by the attention to detail within the book. Three things in particular made me overly, geeky excited: 1)The book is written with navy blue ink. Fantastic! 2)It includes color pictures of many of the artwork discussed. A book with pictures! I love books with pictures! 3)The riotous humor we’ve all come to love and expect from Moore. My goodness with the sex jokes! They’re everywhere!

Moore’s work isn’t for those who take things too seriously. This book would especially not be good for that particular old prude who looks down her nose at “humorist” works (you know who I’m talking about.) However, for all those out there looking for a laugh, fans of Moore, and anyone who takes art a little less than seriously, have a go at Sacre Bleu!

 

 

*Sorry. I could not come up with a quipy title. It seems like there should be one staring me in the face, but, alas, my mind is a blank.

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